News Release: Faculty Experts, Politics

Feb. 3,  2009

Experts Address Health Policy Challenges Ahead

From the Woodruff Health Sciences Center News

Emory University health policy experts are discussing health care issues facing the nation as President Barack Obama and his administration begin looking for solutions. With former Sen. Tom Daschle withdrawing his nomination to head the Department of Health and Human Services, the Obama team will be re-grouping to identify another candidate with the credentials needed to lead.

Additional experts on ethics and public service

Fred Sanfilippo, MD, PhD, executive vice president for health affairs at Emory University, CEO of Emory's Woodruff Health Sciences Center and chairman of Emory Healthcare, is calling for the nation to work to improve its broken health care delivery system. He says true health system transformation will be successful only when all sectors - public and private, state and federal, employer and employee, academic and corporate - come to the table for our nation's greater good.

View a video message from Sanfilippo outlining potential solutions to the health care crisis and identifying key priorities for the Woodruff Health Sciences Center in the coming year.

Michael M.E. Johns, MD, chancellor, Emory University

 Johns is widely renowned as a catalyst of new thinking in many areas of health policy and health professions education. Recently, Johns chaired an Institute of Medicine (IOM) committee that issued a report proposing revisions to medical residents' duty hours and workloads to decrease the chances of fatigue-related medical errors and to enhance the learning environment for doctors-in-training.

Read more about the IOM committee's recommendations.

Johns will moderate a panel discussion on the future of integrative medicine at the IOM Summit on Integrative Medicine and the Health of the Public Feb. 25-27 in Washington.

Kenneth Thorpe, PhD, Robert W. Woodruff Professor and chair of the Department of Health Policy and Management, Emory’s Rollins School of Public Health

Thorpe is formerly deputy assistant secretary for health policy in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services under President Bill Clinton. On Dec. 10 he presented to the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Hearing on “Prevention and Public Health: The Key to Transforming our Sickcare System”

Thorpe also serves as director of Emory’s Institute for Advanced Policy Solutions and executive director of the Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease, a national coalition of more than 110 patient, provider, and community organizations, business and labor groups, and health policy experts committed to raising awareness of the number one cause of death, disability, and rising health care costs in the U.S.: rising rates of preventable and treatable chronic diseases.

Thorpe will discuss the economic stakes and potential returns involved in integrative medicine at the IOM Summit on Integrative Medicine and the Health of the Public Feb. 25-27 in Washington.

Arthur Kellermann, MD, MPH, associate dean for health policy and professor of emergency medicine, Emory School of Medicine

Kellermann, a member of IOM, he co-chaired the Committee on the Consequences of Uninsurance. As a 2006-2007 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, he joined the Professional Staff of the United States House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform in Washington, D.C.

Kathleen Adams, PhD, professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, Emory's Rollins School of Public Health

Trained as an economist, Adams' research focuses on vulnerable, low-income populations. She has headed several large projects related to Medicaid populations and policies at the national level, and has worked extensively on issues of access to health care among low-income women and children.

Adam Atherly, PhD, associate professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, Emory's Rollins School of Public Health

A health economist, Atherly's research explores the costs associated with supplemental Medicare policies and quality of care through outcomes assessments.

Benjamin Druss, MD, MPH, professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, Emory's Rollins School of Public Health

As Emory's first Rosalynn Carter Chair in Mental Health, Druss's research examines mental health care costs and outcomes among the poor, uninsured and underinsured.

Ron Goetzel, PhD, research professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, Emory's Rollins School of Public Health

Goetzel’s work examines large-scale evaluations of health promotion, disease prevention, and demand and disease management programs. He is a nationally recognized and widely published expert in health and productivity management (HPM), return-on-investment (ROI), program evaluation and outcomes research.

Joe Lipscomb, PhD, professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, Emory's Rollins School of Public Health

Lipscomb, a Georgia Cancer Coalition Distinguished Cancer Scholar, is director of cancer economics and outcomes at the Emory Center on Health Outcomes and Quality and holds a secondary appointment at Emory's Winship Cancer Institute. His research focuses on the impact of health policy on cancer treatment outcomes.

Kimberly Rask, MD, PhD, associate professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, Emory's Rollins School of Public Health

Rask's research explores immunization registry costs, primary care practice, cost-effectiveness, performance improvement, and outcomes measurement. She is director of the Emory Center on Health Outcomes and Quality.

The Robert W. Woodruff Health Sciences Center of Emory University is an academic health science and service center focused on missions of teaching, research, health care and public service. Its components include schools of medicine, nursing, and public health; Yerkes National Primate Research Center; the Emory Winship Cancer Institute; and Emory Healthcare, the largest, most comprehensive health system in Georgia. The Woodruff Health Sciences Center has a $2.3 billion budget, 17,000 employees, 2,300 full-time and 1,900 affiliated faculty, 4,300 students and trainees, and a $4.9 billion economic impact on metro Atlanta.

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