News Release: University News

Oct. 28,  2009

The Scientist Magazine Ranks Emory 5th Best Place to Work

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This year The Scientist magazine's readers ranked Emory University as the 5th Best Place to Work in Academia in the United States. The ranking was based on a survey of more than 2,350 life scientists with a permanent position in an academic, hospital, government or research organization. The scientists represented 94 US institutions and 25 institutions from the rest of the world.

Although the university has been highly ranked in previous Best Places to Work for Postdocs rankings, Emory is a newcomer to the top 15 institutions in the Best Places to Work rankings by life scientists.

Overall, respondents focused on collaboration, team building and unique funding opportunities as important work environment factors. Emory ranked especially high in the categories of "peers" and "job satisfaction." The top four institutions were Princeton University, University of California-San Francisco, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. The top international institution was the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics.

"Emory scientists often cite collaborative opportunities and collegiality as positive aspects of their research experience here," says David Stephens, vice president for research in Emory's Woodruff Health Sciences Center. "I'm pleased to see that Emory is being recognized as a place where these peer relationships are important."

Lisa A. Tedesco, dean of the James T. Laney School of Graduate Studies, says the survey  "inspires our efforts to be a truly distinctive and distinguished place to work as a scientist, mentor and researcher. It also provides recognition of the excellent opportunities for science faculty at Emory, including generous support for their graduate students and extensive opportunities for interdisciplinary work and collegial engagement across programs. "  

Respondents assessed their work environments using 38 criteria in eight areas. Results of the survey, and a look at some of the Top 40 US and Top 10 International institutions can be found in the November 2009 issue of The Scientist.

The 2010 Best Places to Work Survey is now open through November to all life science professionals working in academia or industry and as postdocs.

Originally posted October 27, 2009

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